Posts belonging to Category 'Big Bear Lake'

Intermittent Closures for Amgen Tour of California

TRAFFIC ADVISORY FOR BIKE RACE
Palmdale to Big Bear Lake – Friday, May 18, 2012

BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. May 9, 2012 – Amgen Tour of California cycling race from Palmdale to Big Bear Lake will be held on Friday, May 18, 2012. This event will require intermittent closures on State Routes 2, 138, 18, 38, along with roads in Big Bear. The intermittent closures could last between 30 and 60 minutes as the race progresses toward Big Bear. Traffic will be permitted to follow behind the race. It should take the race no longer than 35 minutes to pass intersecting streets along the race course. At times, traffic will be permitted to cross the affected sections of these routes, at the discretion of California Highway Patrol.

Intermittent/Rolling Closures on SR-18 from Crestline to Big Bear Dam:

Rolling closures will begin twenty to thirty minutes before the lead rider arrives. Traffic will be restored IMMEDIATELY after the final rider passes through, which is expected to be approximately 35 minutes after the lead rider. SR-18 from Crestline to the Big Bear Dam will experience closures from approximately 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Spectators, who plan to observe the race along the race routes, such as Rim of the World Highway or the Arctic Circle located on SR-18, are encouraged to arrive before 11a.m.

Intermittent/Rolling Closures on SR-38 from Big Bear Dam to Summit Blvd:

Rolling closures will continue on SR-38 from Big Bear Dam along the north shore of Big Bear Lake, through Fawnskin, and then to Stanfield Cutoff. The estimated time of rolling closures on SR-38 from Big Bear Dam to Stanfield Cutoff is from approximately 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The course continues right onto Big Bear Blvd. to Sandalwood Drive, right onto Fox Farm Road, left onto Garstin Drive, and then to Summit Blvd. for the finish. Closures in the Big Bear Lake area are expected to happen between 2:35 p.m. and 5 p.m.

Intermittent/Rolling Closures:

This is the range of times within which the road may be closed, depending on the speed of the race. Actual closing will only be about one hour with this time frame.

Approximate Times Road Description

2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Hwy 38 between the Dam and Fawnskin

2:35 p.m. – 4:36 p.m. Hwy 38 between Fawnskin and Stanfield cutoff

2:37 p.m. – 4:38 p.m. Stanfield cutoff to Big Bear Blvd and Big Bear Blvd. to Sandlewood Drive*

2:38 p.m. – 4:49 p.m. Sandlewood Drive to Fox Farm Road

2:39 p.m. – 4:40 p.m. Fox Farm Road to Garstin Drive

2:40 p.m. – 4:41 p.m. Garstin to Summit Blvd

2:41 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Summit Blvd to Big Bear Blvd

Closed all Day Summit Blvd South of Big Bear Blvd

Closed all Day Brownie Lane between Ponderosa and Summit Blvd.

2:59 p.m. – 3:57 p.m. Estimated Finish Time of Leaders

*Big Bear Blvd with have the two southbound lanes open all day for 2-way traffic.

Big Bear Lake and the Tour of California

Tour of California Mayors Welcome the Race

KING OF THE MOUNTAIN EXPERIENCE – Tour of California

Cycling Fans Get Opportunity to Ride Portion of the Amgen Tour of California Stage 6 in Big Bear plus Many More Perks

On Friday, May 18 cycling enthusiasts get an opportunity to ride a portion of the same route that the world’s greatest professional cyclists will race on during The Amgen Tour of California Stage 6 Finish in Big Bear Lake. The ride, called The King of the Mountain Experience, is open to all levels of cyclists that want to bask in the glory of riding through the official Amgen Tour of California finish line arch two hours before the actual professionals cross the finish line. Note: King of the Mountain Experience is limited to the first 250 registrants.

Cycling enthusiasts enjoy a 35-mile trek that starts at Snow Summit Mountain Resort, and snakes over to Big Bear Lake’s north shore on Hwy. 38. From there participants are treated to Big Bear’s scenic beauty as they head west down Hwy. 18. This takes them to the turnaround point at Snow Valley Mountain Resort. The cyclists then head back to Snow Summit where they cross through the official Amgen Tour of California finish line arch. The course ride is supported by guides and a full-support crew. There is also a self-timed section on the course that gives participants a read-out of their times that they can compare with the professional race leaders.

In addition to riding 35 miles of the Stage 6 course King of the Mountain Experience participants get certain privileges others do not. Race day perks include V.I.P. finish line area seating, free bike valet, commemorative event tech T-shirt, raffle drawings, finisher’s medal, and limited edition number plate. There is also a V.I.P. reception after the race at Black Diamond Tavern that includes appetizers, no-host bar and cycling celebrities such as Phil Liggett, the official announcer of the race. Other benefits include pre-event bike check lube & tune, discount food and lodging, and Thursday night tour viewing party.

King of the Mountain Experience is Friday, May 18 at the Amgen Tour of California Stage 6 Finish Line at Snow Summit Mountain Resort, located at 880 Summit Blvd. The glory ride is from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., which starts and finishes at Snow Summit. Entry fee is $150 per person. For more information about King of the Mountain Experience or to register log onto www.bigbearclimb.com or www.openairbigbear.com.

Cycle Big Bear Lake!

 

When it comes to cycling, it’s only natural to think of Big Bear as a mountain biking destination. However, Big Bear is well known within the circuit of cyclists as a mecca for road cycling because of its diverse climbs and peak-to-peak rides. Big Bear Lake is 100 miles from California’s coast. Its picturesque mountain-top setting rivals well known cycling mountain ranges throughout the world, such as the French Alps, Italian Dolomites and Canadian Rockies.

The San Bernardino Mountains offer several thigh-searing, lung-starving peaks, cresting over 7,000 feet. A favorite ride by many cycling enthusiasts is a scenic, 9-mile relentless ascent to Onyx Summit, the highest altitude roadway in Southern California. One of the key attractions for serious riders is the ascension up to Onyx Summit, which tops off at 8,443 feet.

Those who love the mountains, but are not into big mountain climbs, will enjoy a casual 40-mile loop; that gently rolls around Big Bear and Baldwin Lakes, providing a spectacular view of dense forests and surrounding peaks. Big Bear Lake is a must, for avid to casual cyclists, to add as a road cycling destination.

Naturally, one of the top choices for cycling in Big Bear Lake is a ride around the lake. The 15 mile journey around the blue jewel is approximately an hour at a casual pace. However, many riders occasionally stop to snap a few photos of the beautiful alpine setting, which leads to lengthen the time of the round trip loop.

A great way to extend a ride around Big Bear Lake is to add Baldwin Lake to the mix. This is ideal for cyclists who like distance rides without vertical mountains. The 40 mile loop gently rolls along both lakes with spectacular views of lush forests and mountain vistas.

It’s best to start this duo-lake ride on the south shore, and head west toward the Big Bear Lake Dam on Hwy. 18. Cross the dam, and continue to ride in a clockwise direction, east to Hwy 38, on the north shore. Here, cyclists will enjoy a scenic seven mile pedal along the lake’s edge. Across the lake are views of Snow Summit and Bear Mountain Ski Resorts. Peeking above the ski resorts in the distance is the façade of Mt. San Gorgonio. Continue on Hwy 38 and take it to Baldwin Lake. Make the right turn at Baldwin Lake road. In four miles the name of the road changes to Shay Meadow and leads you back to Big Bear Blvd. (Hwy 18), for a spin through Big Bear City, and eventually back to Big Bear Lake; to complete the loop.

For avid enthusiasts and adventure seekers, who want to tackle one of Big Bear’s most challenging climbs; a clear choice for local riders is the Keller Peak Ride. The ride is short, but does have some demanding steep portions to Keller Peak; that ascends for a little over 2,000’ in just five miles! This regular weekly group ride for Big Bear cyclists pushes the limits of all different levels of riders. The recommended route is to take Stanfield Cutoff counter clockwise to Hwy 38, and take the north shore route west to Hwy 18. Pass the Big Bear Dam and continue through the “Arctic Circle” and over Lakeview Point for an exceptionally fast and twisty descent towards Running Springs.

An important thing to remember is to make a left off the highway at Deer Lick Fire Station. This is usually where the leg-searing pain begins. It is a steep and narrow road with no outlets, so it’s important to pay attention and ride safely all the way to the fire lookout tower, which is perched high in the sky at 7880’. Most riders who reach the top like to catch a breath, and climb to the top of the tower to enjoy amazing panoramic views from almost 8,000 feet above sea level. On clear days Catalina Island can be seen to the west.

A great place to take kids and beginning riders is a fresh, paved Alpine Pedal Path located on the North shore of Big Bear Lake. The Alpine Pedal Path starts at the east end of the lake at Stanfield Cutoff, and rolls along the shoreline for about 3 ½ miles, passing Juniper Point and Meadows Edge Park. From there the path snakes through the Serrano campground, and pops out on North Shore Lane near the Solar Observatory. This area is a perfect place for a relaxing, lakeside cruise with friends and family, without the hassle of cars!

Big Bear’s cycling-friendly community has two full service bike shops that sell, rent and service bikes. Bike shop staffs include cyclists who provide valuable information and local knowledge of rides in and around Big Bear Lake. All levels of riders are encouraged to take time to experience Big Bear’s small town hospitality, superb mountain roads and stunning landscapes. Big Bear Lake should be added to any cyclist’s list of “Must Visit” cycling destinations.

Pro-Cycling Tips;

  • Seasoned PRO | Cycling Tips – As I get older cycling changes shapes and means different things to me in my life. At first the bike meant that I could get to school quicker. It then became about who could do the highest jumps. It was all about freedom and fun.
  • Victory Salute Like A PRO | Cycling Tips – Bike racing and cycling is filled with unwritten rules and etiquette. Above all, style is paramount. All else is of little importance. You’re only as good as your last race. I regularly get ridiculed for all my unwitting blunders.
  • Bucket List | Cycling Tips – … Ride the cobbles of Paris-Roubaix and Tour of Flanders (will rent a bike and take out insurance for this); Go to the Tour de France with a press pass and blog about all the pro’s cycling tips; Ride the Grand Fondo Sportful in …